LASUTH Performs First Kidney Transplant [2015]

Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH), has recorded a successful kidney transplant on a 56-year-old man in Lagos. The life-saving procedure which took two and half hours was the first of its kind in the tertiary institution.

Speaking on the feat, the elated Chief Medical Director of the hospital, Prof. Wale Oke, said the successful kidney transplant was part of the state government’s promises to deliver excellent healthcare services to the people of Lagos State.
Oke revealed that prior to the surgery, several consultations were made to ensure that the patients were well selected to avoid complications after the exercise.
In his words:
“But thank God today, both the donor and recipient are in sound health.”
The Chief medical Director who assured Lagosians that the hospital would continue to bring such services in-country.
Speaking, leader of the transplant team, a Consultant Nephrologist, Dr. Jacob Awobusuyi, said the initiative was conceived three years ago. Awobusuyi explained that gaining the confidence of the patients was very tough but after the operation, they were both excited.
“Before the operation, both the 56-year-old recipient and the 26-year-old donor who was the patient’s nephew expressed concern. But after the operation they were both fine.”

Bloodless Urine Malaria Test (UMT)

Scientists working in Nigeria have developed a new laser test that can detect malaria in humans within minutes with a simple urine test without drawing blood.

Current malaria testing methods requires piecing the with a needle to draw blood but the new urine malaria test (UMT), developed by Fyodor Biotechnologies, doesn’t require use of blood.

The fast, non-invasive test can detect malaria in both humans and mosquitoes. It has advantages over current techniques because it does not depend on blood sampling, reagents, facilities or trained personnel. The simplicity – it can be operated by non-medical personnel – and sensitivity of the test mean it could be a low-cost, safe and universal tool for clinical and field diagnoses.
Speaking at the launch of UMT in Abuja, Dr Victoria Enwemadu, Fyodor’s global head of projects, said “There are some challenges with adopting that [national malaria testing] guideline mainstream because of the invasiveness of trying to get blood for testing. Now we have made it easier by just using urine to test for malaria.”

According Enwemadu, the UMT includes a strip that is dipped into urine sample for 25 minutes to give results which can be read as positive, negative or valid, when compared against a control.