Thinking Room

Media platforms focusing on good or positive news stories about Nigeria and Nigerians by Fego E. Onowori

PositiveNaija just as the name implies, is dedicated to informing the world on the positive progress and excellence associated with Nigeria and Nigerians in every field of humanity. It aims to gradually but firmly establish in the consciousness of Nigerians the practicability and possibility of their hopes, aspirations, passions, goals and success by adhering to the principles of hardwork, accountability, justice, love, unity, critical thinking as well as other relevant positive values.

As a human-centered enterprise, the mission of PositiveNaija is to continuously strive towards creating a good, well-informed and empathetic society for Nigeria and Nigerians by promoting media professionalism in Nigeria, advancing original Nigerian storytelling and impactful scholarship, encouraging Nigerian patriotism as well as serving as a platform for excellence!

By 2020, PositiveNaija aims to be the most reliable news platform for Nigerians.

The 234 project serves as a platform to promote everything positive, progressive and inspirational about Nigeria – focusing on the beauty of culture, history, food, tourism, sports, arts and other dynamic areas.

Founded in 2015 by Akin Akinboro and Mobolaji Sokunbi, the 234 Project was launched as a platform to promote the accomplishments of Nigerians globally and as an agency with the precise purpose to empower a young generation of Nigerians.

The 234 Project is focused on 3 particular pillars: stewardship (responsible citizens making a difference by impacting lives); empowerment (nurture a community of leaders and achievers to maximize their potentials) and ideations (identifying solutions that will improve the quality of life of Nigerians).

 

*This article was first written by Fego E. Onowori on the 5th of February, 2019 and was last modified on the 7th of February, 2019.

4 thoughts on “Thinking Room”

  1. This is a question.

    We know that Nigeria and Nigerians have umpteen qualities, qualities one may be profoundly proud of. For instance the most generous generosity I ever encountered. The most empathic empathy. To name just a few. These qualities confer esteem, which regrettably is overwhelmingly depressed by countless faults that have befallen the country and which have the place of descriptors for the country in general: Lack of electricity, lack of education, lack of honesty, lack of governmental care, lack of equitable share in resources, lack of economic progress commensurate with the country’ capabilities and resources…. the list goes on and on and on. Things one shouldn’t be proud of or accept. Hence our struggle and striving, inclusion the striving to rebuild self-esteem.

    But here’s a disparity that is confounding conventional wisdom. And I wonder whether it bear a relation ship to the subject of this forum: Why are the people of Nigeria so confident of a prosperous future when so much remains to be righted? See this 2015 survey by Bloomberg http://www.africanbusinesscentral.com/2015/07/27/the-worlds-most-optimistic-people-live-in-africa-infographics/

    1. Dear Felix, thank you for your insight and keen observation of the Nigerian realities. Your question is indeed an excellent one albeit, mysterious as well.

      I will try to give some possible reasons as to why the people of Nigeria are so confident of a prosperous future when so much remains to be righted. Nevertheless, I also believe individual answers to this by Nigerians would provide significant understanding as well.

      First, in reference to the 2015 survey by Bloomberg (which you have shared), considering a number of unknown elements as regards the conduct of the survey, here is my thinking:
      – The survey was conducted between March-May 2015: This period witnessed a new government (of President Buhari), one that gave a sort of generally fresh and high levels of optimism to the Nigerian peoples and their prosperity.
      – Although, it might seem insignificant, and with all due respect to Bloomberg’s effort, I however believe that the survey methodology of telephone interviews might have also contributed to such optimism. It is not easy to get Nigerians to talk about the harsh realities of the country over the phone – in-person, yes but not over the phone. Most of the time, this is as a result of security issues – of their various interests.

      Secondly, the following:
      – Natural optimism: It is difficult to explain this but Nigerians are very optimistic about the prosperity of the country. Nigerians really just love being Nigerians. Majority of Nigerians cannot imagine a non-existent Nigeria.
      High level of tolerance: This point might seem not to be the case, but it is true. The political sphere rather makes this appear unreal.
      – Game-changers: This point refers to those Nigerians who are resolute in their industry to make a difference in seeing the prosperity of the country come into full manifestation. They believe in their work, skill and experience to have the Nigeria of our collective dreams by doing as much as possible what is right all the time.
      – Religion: Nigerians are very religious people and sometimes to a fault, with little or no effort into doing the required work and the right things where such is needed. So there is an overwhelming ‘faith’ in God saving the country of its mess and redeeming its destiny. It is a tough faith I must say.
      – History/Culture: Nigerians take a lot of pride in their history (sometimes, mostly tied to their ethnicity). It gives a string sense of who they are and what they can become.
      – Short-shortsightedness: This reason can be seen in how much instant gratification we celebrate or short-term successes and thus, a belief that we can always reproduce this even amidst challenges.
      – Ignorance: Really, most Nigerians cannot really tell why they still believe in the prosperity of the country. For this group, they genuinely do not have the insight of how societies evolve and advance neither do they fully comprehend the consequence of their actions to the society at large. These group look at such prosperity from the view point of just their immediate family or clan and are very confident of well they are advancing (even though otherwise but this is largely influenced also by culture). Therefore, ‘prosperity’ assumes different interpretations.
      – Fear/timidity: This is a point not to be overlooked and indeed real. Some Nigerians (if not most), are really having a confidence not born out of joy but rather fear. The spread of helplessness, breakdown of unreliable societal institutions/systems, etc. contribute to this whereby the only choice they have is just to be ‘hopeful’.

      These are some points I believe could shed some light to your question.

      However, while I feel and share this confidence, I also perceive a huge and growing distrust at the moment to the collective prosperity of the country.

      You question has also raised in my mind, the need to conduct a more recent survey to ascertain this. I will try to see to this.

      Thanks again and best regards.

      1. I also believe in the natural optimism part. We as Nigerians believe in a brighter future and we are very resilient. However, the negative part of being resilient is the fact that we have just been so laid back and allowed just anything to happen under our watch. Thankfully, different groups are rising up bit by bit to change the status quo.

        So for Felix’s question, I believe that it’s just who we are as a people….it’s a product of what we have been through as a nation…we go through a lot of hardship but we are happy people!

        1. Dear Grace, thanks a lot for your comment.

          I agree with you especially this:
          “Thankfully, different groups are rising up bit by bit to change the status quo.”

          Just yesterday, I came across Fela Durotoye and I am very impressed with his vision and commitment towards changing the status quo. I am inspired by his work.

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